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SOLD - Technicolor System 3 (No. 10) Hand Crank 35mm Movie Camera | Akeley Gyro Tripod

  • Technicolor System 3 (No. 10) Hand Crank 35mm Movie Camera | Akeley Gyro Tripod
  • Technicolor System 3 (No. 10) Hand Crank 35mm Movie Camera | Akeley Gyro Tripod
  • Technicolor System 3 (No. 10) Hand Crank 35mm Movie Camera | Akeley Gyro Tripod
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Product Description

Technicolor System 3 (No. 10) Hand Crank 35mm Movie Camera + Akeley Gyro Tripod

Ultra Rare

 

 About This Camera

Our Technicolor System 3 (or Process 3) (No. 10) was in use from 1927 to 1933. In 1916, the Silver Screen became the Technicolor screen, when this motion picture coloring process was invented. System 3 was based on the techniques of the original 1916 Process 1, but “was developed to eliminate the projection print made of double-cemented prints in favor of a print created by dye imbibition. The Technicolor camera for Process 3 was identical to that for Process 2, simultaneously photographing two consecutive frames of a black-and-white film behind red and green filters.” (Wikipedia)

Films shot with Technicolor System 3 include “The Viking” (1928, Paramount), which was the first feature made entirely in the Technicolor Process 3; and “On with the Show” (1929, Warner Bros.), the first all-taking color feature. 

Camera No. 10 is one of Technicolor's ground-breaking two-color, System 3, dye-imbibition cameras, in use during the 1930s.

“System 3 used separate negatives for the red and green images, from which positive matrices in relief were made which acted like a rubber stamp. These were dyed red and green, and then rolled into contact with a strip of clear film coated with a dye absorbing emulsion.” (amps.net, used with permission)

System 3 moved color from novelty to mainstream and represents a critical technological advancement leading to the later, better known Technicolor three-strip process used for such classics as The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind. The camera and its various accessory items were acquired directly from Technicolor in the mid-1970s and have been in storage ever since.

For More Technicolor Process Information: http://widescreenmuseum.com/oldcolor/ball.htm


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